Interesting

William Howard Taft - Facts, Presidency and Accomplishments

William Howard Taft - Facts, Presidency and Accomplishments


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

The Republican William Howard Taft worked as a judge in Ohio Superior Court and in the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals before accepting a post as the first civilian governor of the Philippines in 1900. In 1904, Taft took on the role of secretary of war in the administration of Theodore Roosevelt, who threw his support to the Ohioan as his successor in 1908. Generally more conservative than Roosevelt, Taft also lacked his expansive view of presidential power, and was generally a more successful administrator than politician. By 1912, Roosevelt, dissatisfied with Taft’s presidency, had formed his own Progressive Party, splitting Republican voters and handing the White House to the Democrat Woodrow Wilson. Nine years after leaving office, Taft achieved his lifelong goal when President Warren Harding appointed him chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court; he held that post until just before his death in 1930.

Taft’s Early Life and Career

William Howard Taft was born on September 15, 1857, in Cincinnati, Ohio. His father was Alphonso Taft, a prominent Republican attorney who served as secretary of war and attorney general under President Ulysses S. Grant, then ambassador to Austria-Hungary and Russia under President Chester A. Arthur. The younger Taft attended Yale University (graduating second in his class) before studying law at the University of Cincinnati. He was admitted to the Ohio bar in 1880 and entered private practice. In 1886, Taft married Helen “Nettie” Herron, the daughter of another prominent local lawyer and Republican Party activist; the couple would have three children.

From early in his career, Taft aspired to a seat on the U.S. Supreme Court. His ambitious wife, meanwhile, set her sights on becoming first lady. With her encouragement, Taft accepted several political appointments, beginning in 1887 when he was named to fill the term of a judge in Ohio Superior Court. He was elected to a five-year term himself the following year. (Other than the presidency, it would be the only office Taft ever obtained through a popular vote.) In 1890, he was appointed as U.S. solicitor general, the third-highest position in the justice department. Two years later, he began serving as a judge on the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, which had jurisdiction over Ohio, Michigan, Tennessee and Kentucky.

Taft’s Path to the White House

In early 1900, President William McKinley called Taft to Washington and tasked him with setting up a civilian government in the Philippines, which had become a U.S. protectorate after the Spanish-American War (1898). Though hesitant, Taft accepted the post of chairman of the Second Philippine Commission with the knowledge that it would position him well to advance further in national government. Taft’s sympathetic administration in the Philippines marked a dramatic departure from the brutal tactics used there by the U.S. military government since 1898. Beginning with the drafting of a new constitution (including a Bill of Rights similar to that of the United States) and the creation of the post of civilian governor (he became the first), Taft improved the island economy and infrastructure and allowed the people at least some voice in government. Though sympathetic to the Filipino people and popular among them, he believed they needed considerable guidance and instruction before they could be capable of self-rule, and predicted a long period of U.S. involvement; in fact, the Philippines would not gain independence until 1946.

After McKinley was assassinated in 1901, President Theodore Roosevelt twice offered Taft a Supreme Court appointment, but he declined in order to stay in the Philippines. In 1904, he agreed to return and become Roosevelt’s secretary of war, as long as he retained supervision of Filipino affairs. Taft traveled extensively during his four years in this post, including overseeing the construction of the Panama Canal and serving as provisional governor of Cuba. Roosevelt, who had pledged not to run for a third term in office, began promoting Taft as his successor. Though he disliked campaigning, Taft agreed to mount a presidential run in 1908 at the urging of his wife, and soundly defeated Democrat William Jennings Bryan by pledging to continue the Rooseveltian program of progressive reforms.

The Taft Presidency

Despite his pledge, Taft lacked Roosevelt’s expansive view of presidential power, as well as his charisma as a leader and his physical vigor. (Always heavy, Taft weighed as much as 300 pounds at times during his presidency.) Though he was initially active in “trust-busting,” initiating some 80 antitrust suits against large industrial combinations–twice as many as Roosevelt–he later backed away from these efforts, and in general aligned himself with the more conservative members of the Republican Party. In 1909, Taft’s convention of a special session of Congress to debate tariff reform legislation spurred the Republican protectionist majority to action and led to passage of the Payne-Aldrich Act, which did little to lower tariffs. Though more progressive Republicans (such as Roosevelt) expected Taft to veto the bill, he signed it into law and publicly defended it as “the best tariff bill that the Republican Party ever passed.”

In another key misstep where progressives were concerned, Taft upheld the policies of Secretary of the Interior Richard Ballinger, and dismissed Ballinger’s leading critic, Gifford Pinchot, a conservationist and close friend of Roosevelt who served as head of the Bureau of Forestry. Pinchot’s firing split the Republican Party further and estranged Taft from Roosevelt for good. Often overlooked in the record of Taft’s presidency were his achievements, including his trust-busting efforts, his empowering of the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) to set railroad rates, and his support of constitutional amendments mandating a federal income tax and the direct election of senators by the people (as opposed to appointment by state legislatures).

Taft’s Post-Presidency and Supreme Court Career

By 1912, Roosevelt was so incensed with Taft and the conservative Republicans that he chose to break from the party and form his own Progressive Party (also known as the Bull Moose Party). In the general election that year, the divide among Republicans handed the White House to the progressive Democrat Woodrow Wilson, who received 435 electoral votes to Roosevelt’s 88. Taft received only eight electoral votes, reflecting the repudiation of his administration’s policies in the wave of progressive spirit that was then sweeping the nation.

Undoubtedly relieved to be leaving the White House, Taft took a position teaching constitutional law at Yale University Law School. In 1921, President Warren Harding fulfilled Taft’s lifelong dream by appointing him chief justice of the United States Supreme Court. In that post, Taft improved the organization and efficiency of the nation’s highest court and helped secure passage of the Judge’s Act of 1925, which gave the court greater discretion in choosing its cases. He wrote some 250 decisions, most reflecting his conservative ideology. Taft’s most prominent opinion came in Myers v. United States (1926), which invalidated tenure of office acts limiting the president’s authority to remove federal officials; President Andrew Johnson’s violation of a similar act had led to his impeachment by the House of Representatives in 1868. Taft remained chief justice until shortly before his death, on March 8, 1930, from complications of heart disease.


Access hundreds of hours of historical video, commercial free, with HISTORY Vault. Start your free trial today.

PHOTO GALLERIES


William Taft

Summary of President William Taft for Kids: "Big Lub"
Summary: William Taft (1857-1930), nicknamed the "Big Lub" , was the 27th American President and served in office from 1909-1913. The Presidency of William Taft spanned the period in United States history that encompasses the events of the Maturation Era or the Gilded Age . President William Taft represented the Republican political party which influenced the domestic and foreign policies of his presidency including Taft's Dollar Diplomacy.

The major accomplishments and the famous, main events that occurred during the time that William Taft was president included the Antitrust Policy, the Ballinger-Pinchot affair and the 1909 Payne-Aldrich Tariff Act. The Angel Island Immigration Station opened on January 21, 1910 in San Francisco Bay, California and the world was shocked by the Sinking of the Titanic in 1912. William Taft died of a heart attack on March 8, 1930, aged 72. The next president was Woodrow Wilson.

Life of William Taft for kids - William Taft Fact File
The summary and fact file of William Taft provides bitesize facts about his life.

The Nickname of William Taft: "Big Lub"
The nickname of President William Taft provides an insight into how the man was viewed by the American public during his presidency. The meaning of the nickname "Big Lub" together with "Big Will" and "Big Chief" are a reference to his large size. His wife, Helen Taft, gave him the nickname of the "Sleeping Beauty" due to his habit of falling asleep on car rides.

Character and Personality Type of William Taft
The character traits of President William Taft can be described as outgoing, genial, gregarious, amiable and diligent, with a strong sense of responsibility. It has been speculated that the Myers-Briggs personality type for William Taft is an ESFJ (Extraversion, Sensing, Feeling, Judgment). An outgoing, sociable, expressive character and a nurturer of established social institutions. William Taft Personality type: Friendly, gregarous, cooperative, observant and informative.

Accomplishments of William Taft and the Famous Events during his Presidency
The accomplishments of William Taft and the most famous events during his presidency are provided in
an interesting, short summary format detailed below.

William Taft for kids - The Progressive Movement
Summary of the Progressive Movement: The Progressive Movement and Progressive Reforms continued during the presidency of William Taft addressing political and social reforms relating to working conditions, child labor, education and female suffrage. Bribery and corruption, the political machines and unfair business practices were also attacked.

William Taft for kids - Payne-Aldrich Tariff Act of 1909
Summary of the Payne-Aldrich Tariff Act of 1909: The Payne-Aldrich Tariff Act of 1909 was designed to lower tariff rates but but also enacted a corporation tax. The law alienated President William Taft from the Progressives and Conservative Republicans who criticized the president for being weak and indecisive.

William Taft for kids - 1909 Ballinger-Pinchot Scandal
Summary of the Ballinger-Pinchot Scandal: The Ballinger-Pinchot Scandal exploded in November 1909 when conservationist Gifford Pinchot revealed that Richard Ballinger, the Secretary of the Interior, had made nearly 1 million acres of Alaskan public forests and coal fields open to private development.

William Taft for kids - US and the Mexican Revolution
Summary of the US and the Mexican Revolution: The US and the Mexican Revolution (1910 - 1920) saw two episodes of intervention and involvement by the US in the Mexican Revolution led by revolutionaries including Francisco "Pancho" Villa and Emiliano Zapata Salazar.

William Taft for kids - Mann-Elkins Act of 1910
Summary of the Mann-Elkins Act of 1910: The Mann-Elkins Act of 1910 set railroad rates and regulate the telecommunications industry . The new law extended the authority of the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) to cover telephones, telegraphs and radio companies.

William Taft for kids - 1910 Postal Savings System
Summary of the Postal Savings System: The Postal Savings System was established by the Postal Savings Depository Act of 1910 introducing a system whereby certificates or savings stamps were issued to depositors as proof of their deposit and could be exchanged in amounts of $20 or more for postal savings bonds.

William Taft for kids - 1910: Angel Island Immigration Station
Summary of the Angel Island Immigration Station: The Angel Island Immigration Station was opened on January 21, 1910 in San Francisco Bay, California as a detention center for immigrants from China, Japan and Asia.

William Taft for kids - 1912: Sinking of the Titanic
Summary of the Sinking of the Titanic: The Sinking of the Titanic occurred on 15 April 1912 when the British passenger ship struck an iceberg and sank into the North Atlantic Ocean. A total of 1523 people died, there were only 705 survivors on the "unsinkable" ship.

President William Taft Video for Kids
The article on the accomplishments of William Taft provides an overview and summary of some of the most important events during his presidency. The following William Taft video will give you additional important facts about the events of his administration.

Accomplishments of President William Taft

William Taft - US History - William Taft Facts - William Taft Biography - Important Events - Accomplishments - President William Taft - Summary of Presidency - American History - US - USA History - William Taft - America - Dates - United States History - US History for Kids - Children - Schools - Homework - Important Events - Facts - History - United States History - Important Facts - Events - History - Interesting - President William Taft - Info - Information - American History - William Taft Facts - Historical Events - Important Events - William Taft


William Howard Taft - Facts, Presidency and Accomplishments - HISTORY

Distinguished jurist, effective administrator, but poor politician, William Howard Taft spent four uncomfortable years in the White House. Large, jovial, conscientious, he was caught in the intense battles between Progressives and conservatives, and got scant credit for the achievements of his administration.

Born in 1857, the son of a distinguished judge, he graduated from Yale, and returned to Cincinnati to study and practice law. He rose in politics through Republican judiciary appointments, through his own competence and availability, and because, as he once wrote facetiously, he always had his "plate the right side up when offices were falling."

But Taft much preferred law to politics. He was appointed a Federal circuit judge at 34. He aspired to be a member of the Supreme Court, but his wife, Helen Herron Taft, held other ambitions for him.

His route to the White House was via administrative posts. President McKinley sent him to the Philippines in 1900 as chief civil administrator. Sympathetic toward the Filipinos, he improved the economy, built roads and schools, and gave the people at least some participation in government.

President Roosevelt made him Secretary of War, and by 1907 had decided that Taft should be his successor. The Republican Convention nominated him the next year.

Taft disliked the campaign--"one of the most uncomfortable four months of my life." But he pledged his loyalty to the Roosevelt program, popular in the West, while his brother Charles reassured eastern Republicans. William Jennings Bryan, running on the Democratic ticket for a third time, complained that he was having to oppose two candidates, a western progressive Taft and an eastern conservative Taft.

Progressives were pleased with Taft's election. "Roosevelt has cut enough hay," they said "Taft is the man to put it into the barn." Conservatives were delighted to be rid of Roosevelt--the "mad messiah."

Taft recognized that his techniques would differ from those of his predecessor. Unlike Roosevelt, Taft did not believe in the stretching of Presidential powers. He once commented that Roosevelt "ought more often to have admitted the legal way of reaching the same ends."

Taft alienated many liberal Republicans who later formed the Progressive Party, by defending the Payne-Aldrich Act which unexpectedly continued high tariff rates. A trade agreement with Canada, which Taft pushed through Congress, would have pleased eastern advocates of a low tariff, but the Canadians rejected it. He further antagonized Progressives by upholding his Secretary of the Interior, accused of failing to carry out Roosevelt's conservation policies.

In the angry Progressive onslaught against him, little attention was paid to the fact that his administration initiated 80 antitrust suits and that Congress submitted to the states amendments for a Federal income tax and the direct election of Senators. A postal savings system was established, and the Interstate Commerce Commission was directed to set railroad rates.

In 1912, when the Republicans renominated Taft, Roosevelt bolted the party to lead the Progressives, thus guaranteeing the election of Woodrow Wilson.

Taft, free of the Presidency, served as Professor of Law at Yale until President Harding made him Chief Justice of the United States, a position he held until just before his death in 1930. To Taft, the appointment was his greatest honor he wrote: "I don't remember that I ever was President."


Life after the presidency of William Howard Taft

On his departure from the White House, Taft returned to Yale, where he became a professor of constitutional law. With the entry of the United States into World War I, he served on the National War Labor Board, and at the war’s conclusion he strongly supported American participation in the League of Nations.

In 1921 Pres. Warren G. Harding appointed Taft chief justice of the United States, launching what was probably the happiest period in Taft’s long career in public service. He promptly took steps to improve the efficiency of the Supreme Court, which had fallen far behind in its work. His influence was decisive in securing passage of the Judge’s Act of 1925, which gave the Supreme Court greater discretion in choosing its cases so that it could focus more attention on constitutional questions and other issues of national importance.

Although generally conservative in his judicial philosophy, Taft was no rigid ideologue. His approval of court injunctions, for example, was limited by his insistence that injunctions could not be employed to interfere with the rights of workers to organize and strike. His most important contribution to constitutional law was his opinion in Myers v. United States (1926) upholding the authority of the president to remove federal officials, a much-belated endorsement of the position taken by Andrew Johnson with respect to the Tenure of Office Act in his impeachment trial in 1868.

Suffering from heart disease, Taft resigned as chief justice on February 3, 1930, and he died a little more than a month later.


William Howard Taft Leadership

William Howard Taft, the 27th president of the United States, had a lot of accomplishments to his credit. However, when it came to William Howard Taft's leadership style, it could be said that he did not have the passion for the position. Also, he was forced to operate in the shadows of his predecessor, Theodore Roosevelt, who was known to be forceful, energetic and a natural leader.

However, this did not dent Taft's popularity or his reputation. He had many traits that were invaluable to the office and the administration, but he is still viewed as a president who did not have the necessary skills for the office.

When Taft became the president, he had all intentions of carrying on with the progressive reforms started by Theodore Roosevelt. In fact, Taft was responsible for having more trust prosecutions than Roosevelt, including Standard Oil and American Tobacco Company. However, Taft did not have the ideological power or the ability to interpret the power that came with being the president. This resulted in him alienating all the politicians in the Republican Party who were progressive. Taft managed to do a compromise with the conservative over tariff reduction, which again did not speak highly of his willingness to progressive reforms. Many reformers actually considered him to be a traitor.

However, on the other hand, Taft was not afraid of showing off the US military might in order to protect business interests of the nation. He sent troops to Honduras and Nicaragua when a revolution in those countries was eminent. This was done to protect US property and citizens. At the same time, when revolutions were taking place in Mexico and China, Taft decided not to interfere.

It can be said that William Howard Taft's leadership style was to do what the political machinery dictated rather than what the majority of the public wanted.

William Howard Taft was the 27th president of the United States. Later, he became the 10th Chief Justice of the United States. When Taft became the president, he was adamant on continuing the program started by Roosevelt. His main aim was to create a framework that would allow the reforms to take place without any problems. More..


William Howard Taft’s Presidency

  • On March 4, 1909, William Howard Taft took his oath as the 27th President of the United States at the Senate Chamber, U.S. Capitol.In July 1909, Congress passed a resolution amending the Constitution regarding the collection of personal income tax by the federal government as proposed by the newly-elected president. It became the Sixteenth Amendment.
  • In July 1909, Congress passed a resolution amending the Constitution regarding the collection of personal income tax by the federal government as proposed by the newly-elected president. It became the Sixteenth Amendment.
  • The Payne-Aldrich Tariff Act was signed in August 1909. It lowered the levied taxes on selected imported goods.
    In June 1910, he signed the Postal Savings Bank Act, which allowed one bank per state to be supervised by the federal government, which would give 2% interest on savings less than $500.
  • The reciprocity agreement with Canada was rejected by the Canadian legislature in September 1911.
  • Taft sent 20,000 federal troops to the borders of Mexico during the Mexican uprising against the dictator Porfirio Diaz. The mobilization was to protect Americans living in Mexico.
  • The friendship between Japan and the United States was symbolically interpreted through the planting of the first cherry trees along the Tidal Basin in Washington. It was planted by
  • First Lady Helen Herron and Viscountess Chinda, wife of the Japanese ambassador.
  • The Children’s Bureau in the Department of Commerce was created in order to protect the children’s welfare.
  • On January 6, 1912, New Mexico was admitted to the Union followed by Arizona on February 14, 1912.
  • The Sixteenth Amendment of the Constitution was ratified on February 25, 1913, allowing the collection of income taxes. The Webb-Kenyon Interstate Liquor Act was passed by Congress after the President’s veto in 1913.
  • During the 1912 elections, Taft was again nominated as the Republican Party’s presidential candidate but lost to the Democrat Woodrow Wilson.
  • He was the first to have a presidential automobile. Taft was also the first president to throw the ceremonial pitch in a baseball game. In contrast to the list of firsts, Taft was the last president to have facial hair.

William Howard Taft - Facts, Presidency and Accomplishments - HISTORY


Distinguished jurist, effective administrator, but poor politician, William Howard Taft spent four uncomfortable years in the White House. Large, jovial, conscientious, he was caught in the intense battles between Progressives and conservatives, and got scant credit for the achievements of his administration.

Born in 1857, the son of a distinguished judge, he graduated from Yale, and returned to Cincinnati to study and practice law. He rose in politics through Republican judiciary appointments, through his own competence and availability, and because, as he once wrote facetiously, he always had his "plate the right side up when offices were falling."

But Taft much preferred law to politics. He was appointed a Federal circuit judge at 34. He aspired to be a member of the Supreme Court, but his wife, Helen Herron Taft, held other ambitions for him.

His route to the White House was via administrative posts. President McKinley sent him to the Philippines in 1900 as chief civil administrator. Sympathetic toward the Filipinos, he improved the economy, built roads and schools, and gave the people at least some participation in government.

President Roosevelt made him Secretary of War, and by 1907 had decided that Taft should be his successor. The Republican Convention nominated him the next year.

Taft disliked the campaign--"one of the most uncomfortable four months of my life." But he pledged his loyalty to the Roosevelt program, popular in the West, while his brother Charles reassured eastern Republicans. William Jennings Bryan, running on the Democratic ticket for a third time, complained that he was having to oppose two candidates, a western progressive Taft and an eastern conservative Taft.

Progressives were pleased with Taft's election. "Roosevelt has cut enough hay," they said "Taft is the man to put it into the barn." Conservatives were delighted to be rid of Roosevelt--the "mad messiah."

Taft recognized that his techniques would differ from those of his predecessor. Unlike Roosevelt, Taft did not believe in the stretching of Presidential powers. He once commented that Roosevelt "ought more often to have admitted the legal way of reaching the same ends."

Taft alienated many liberal Republicans who later formed the Progressive Party, by defending the Payne-Aldrich Act which unexpectedly continued high tariff rates. A trade agreement with Canada, which Taft pushed through Congress, would have pleased eastern advocates of a low tariff, but the Canadians rejected it. He further antagonized Progressives by upholding his Secretary of the Interior, accused of failing to carry out Roosevelt's conservation policies.

In the angry Progressive onslaught against him, little attention was paid to the fact that his administration initiated 80 antitrust suits and that Congress submitted to the states amendments for a Federal income tax and the direct election of Senators. A postal savings system was established, and the Interstate Commerce Commission was directed to set railroad rates.

In 1912, when the Republicans renominated Taft, Roosevelt bolted the party to lead the Progressives, thus guaranteeing the election of Woodrow Wilson.

Taft, free of the Presidency, served as Professor of Law at Yale until President Harding made him Chief Justice of the United States, a position he held until just before his death in 1930. To Taft, the appointment was his greatest honor he wrote: "I don't remember that I ever was President."


15 Facts About William Howard Taft

Here are 15 larger-than-life fun facts to help you celebrate William Howard Taft—born 157 years ago yesterday—and his plus-sized legacy.

1. He Was the Last President to Rock Facial Hair While in Office.

Between the Lincoln and Taft administrations, all but two commanders-in-chief boasted some sort of face fuzz. But since our 27th president left the White House in 1913, clean-shaven candidates have monopolized the job.

2. Taft’s Family Maintained a Long-Standing Political Dynasty.

His son, Robert (also known as “Mr. Republican”), became one of the twentieth century’s most influential senators his grandson—William Howard Taft IV—went on to tackle various executive duties for Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush.

3. A Dairy Expo Once Spent Two Days Fretting Over his Missing Milk Cow.

Pauline Wayne was quite the bovine beauty. A gift from Wisconsin Senator Isaac Stephenson, this purebred cow produced roughly eight gallons of daily milk for the first family. Sensing a crowd-pleaser, the 1911 International Dairymen’s Exposition arranged to transport her all the way from D.C. to Milwaukee—but Pauline’s train car wound up getting lost en route. After some frenzied telegraphing, the President’s cow was discovered two days later in a Chicago stockyard, where she just barely avoided getting slaughtered.

4. Taft Valued Being on the Supreme Court Over his Presidency.

Though he’s best remembered for his one-term stint on Pennsylvania Avenue, Taft had been pining for the Judicial Branch since 1889. Upon becoming Chief Justice in 1921, he happily declared “I don’t remember that I was ever president.”

5. He Debuted the “Presidential First Pitch.”

Hall of Famer Walter Johnson managed to snag a low-flying ball Taft gracelessly lobbed from the stands at the start of a 1910 Washington Senators game. One hundred and four years later, this opening day tradition’s still going strong.

6. Taft’s Wife Crashed the 1912 DNC to Shield Him from Ridicule.

It’s hard to demean someone whose spouse is sitting right in front of you. After her husband won the Republican presidential nomination, First Lady Helen Herron “Nellie” Taft made a beeline for the Democratic National Convention in Baltimore. Grabbing a front-row seat, she stared down orator after orator, including the cantankerous William Jennings Bryan of Nebraska, who suddenly decided to soften his anti-Taft rhetoric.

7. His Nicknames Included “Big Bill” and “Big Lub.”

For the record, Nellie called him “Sleeping Beauty” due to Taft’s bad habit of dozing off at parties (more on that later).

8. Taft Swore in Two Other Presidents.

As Chief Justice, he administered the oath of office to fellow conservatives Calvin Coolidge and Herbert Hoover.

9. He Briefly Worked as a Part-Time Reporter.

Taft covered courthouse news for The Cincinnati Commercial while making ends meet as a law student. However, after becoming president, his attitude towards journalists cooled considerably.

10. He Lost 70 Pounds After Leaving the White House.

“I can truthfully say that I never felt any younger in all my life,” Taft announced, having given up bread, potatoes, pork, and liquor. “Too much flesh is bad for any man.”

11. You Know About Teddy Bears, But “Billy Possums”?

Ever been to a “Build-An-Opossum” workshop? Neither have we. Worried that America’s Teddy Bear mania would evaporate after Roosevelt’s last term, toy manufacturers started producing stuffed “Billy Possums”—named in president-elect Taft’s honor—en masse. Needless to say, these things didn’t last long.

12. Taft Tended to Fall Asleep at Public Functions.

“Most of the time,” admitted Indiana Senator James Watson, “[Taft] simply did not and could not function in alert fashion… Often while I was talking to him after a meal, his head would fall over on his breast and he would go sound asleep for 10 or 15 minutes. He would waken and resume the conversation, only to repeat the performance in the course of half an hour or so.” President Taft was also seen snoozing at operas, funerals, and—especially—church services.

13. He Successfully Lobbied for the Modern Supreme Court Building.

The government’s Judicial Branch didn’t always convene in the majestic building we know today. Before 1935, the Supreme Court issued its rulings from various rooms inside the Capitol. Chief Justice Taft changed all that, successfully lobbying Congress to give the Court its own separate building at a cost of $10 million.

14. Taft Recently Became One of the Washington Nationals’ Racing Mascots.

Since 2006, wonky caricatures of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, and Teddy Roosevelt have been sprinting across the Nats’ home field and into the hearts of D.C. sports fans. These Rushmore racers were given some awfully big competition when Taft was added to their roster in 2013. “He might even give Teddy a run for his money,” said Nationals COO Andy Feffer.

15. Taft Once Had an Embarrassing Bathtub Incident (No, Not That One).

Today, most people remember Taft as “the president who got stuck in a bathtub while in office.” The actual evidence behind this particular washroom anecdote is rather murky, but at least one of Taft’s bathing sessions ended in catastrophe. While entering a hotel tub in 1915, the ex-president apparently failed to take fluid displacement into account. A wave of Taft’s dirty bathwater instantly poured out, seeped through the floor, and started dripping all over people’s heads on the level beneath him. Though briefly humiliated, Taft made light of the situation. While looking out at the Atlantic Ocean shortly thereafter, he quipped, “I’ll get a piece of that fenced in some day, and then I venture to say there won’t be any overflow.”


Accomplishments by William Howard Taft

Here is quick look at the top 8 accomplishments by William Howard Taft, the 27th President of the United States who served from March 4, 1909 to March 4, 1913.

He was only 23 when he became an assistant prosecutor

During his law school days, William Howard Taft was not the brightest of his however, he did cover enormous grounds with sheer determination and hard work. , William naturally gravitated into the law profession considering the fact that his father, Alphonso Taft, was a judge and a Attorney General in President Ulysses S. Grant’s cabinet.

At Yale, he graduated second in a class of 121 pupils. After a Bachelor of Laws from the Cincinnati Law School, William garnered some experience working in his father’s law firm this was after he had passed the bar examinations in Columbus, Ohio.

In 1880, at just the age of 23, William secured the position of assistant prosecutor for Hamilton County. He stayed in that job for about a year or so before moving on to his next big gig.

An upright Internal Revenue Collector

In spite of the efforts of several White House chiefs to curb the spoils system, nepotism and favoritism were still rife throughout the latter decades of the 19 th century. William Taft’s integrity was tested when he was asked by superiors above him to fire competent employees under him. Taft had been appointed Collector of Internal Revenue for Ohio’s First District during Chester A. Arthur’s presidency.

Rather than comply with the directives from above to dismiss competent employees who had fallen out with the ruling party, William Howard Taft resigned his position.

Sixth Solicitor General of the United States

Between 1890 and 1892, Taft served as the sixth Solicitor General of the United States. The office, which was first established during Ulysses S. Grant’s presidency, requires the holder to argue and present cases on behalf of the federal government before the U.S. Supreme Court. The Solicitor General is also allowed to file amicus curiae briefs before the court.

Taft was at a remarkable young age of 29 at the time of his appointment. The Ohio-born worked very hard to clear all outstanding cases that had been sitting in the office. In his two-year stay in the office, he won 15 out of 18 cases he presented before the nation’s highest court.

A US Court of Appeals Judge (1892-1900)

His illustrious work at the Solicitor General’s office caught the attention of President Benjamin Harrison. In early spring of 1892, Taft resigned from the office in order to take up an advance his judicial career as a federal judge. Taft was pretty much content with the work, quickly learning the ins and outs of the job.

He was not as conservative as many people think he was. As a federal judge, He objectively supported unions’ right to freely organize and agitate for better working conditions. Especially on negligence on the part of employers, Taft always ruled in favor of employees. A case in point was in Voight v. Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Railway Co (1900), where a worker got injured.

William Howard Taft uplifted the socio-economic livelihoods of Filipinos

When President William McKinley tapped Taft to be a member of the civilian commission that would run the newly annexed country of the Philippines, Taft was very reluctant. In all honesty, Taft was not an astute politician. What he best excelled at was in law. Nevertheless, Taft accepted McKinley’s offer and sailed to the Philippines in April 1900 to serve as the first governor-general of the island.

Opposed to colonial rule, Taft during his tenure as governor-general of the Philippines worked very hard to get Filipinos ready for self-government. He was against any maltreatment of Filipinos as racially inferior to Americans. He established programs in education, health, agriculture and arts that uplifted the socio-economic livelihoods of Filipinos. Owing to his devotion to the Philippines, a number places in the country were named after him.

Secretary of War under President Theodore Roosevelt

Unbeknownst to many people, Taft was actually one of the people who urged President McKinley to appoint Theodore Roosevelt to the position of Assistant Secretary of the Navy. The young and upcoming Teddy Roosevelt went on to take the world by storm, becoming a war hero in the Spanish-American War and later Vice President in McKinley’s second term. And upon Teddy becoming the president of the United States after McKinley assassination in 1901, Taft was appointed Secretary of War (42 nd in the nation’s history) in January 1904. Initially, Taft was reluctant to take President Roosevelt’s offer. This was due to his commitment to the people of the Philippines.

As secretary of war, Taft supervised the construction of Panama Canal, which was completed in August 1914. Following Cuba’s request for America’s help in resolving the conflict that was brewing, Taft briefly served as the Provisional Governor of Cuba.

Elected 27th President of the United States

In the lead up to the 1908 U.S. presidential election, Taft was tapped by President Theodore Roosevelt to succeed him in the White House. The two men had a lot in common, and for years, Taft had served Teddy in several troubleshooting capacity.

With the support of Roosevelt, Taft easily won the Democratic Party nomination for the election. In November, 1908, he faced off with William Jennings Bryan. Taft’s campaign was always at odds with the free silver policy of veteran politician Bryan. Taft viewed free silver as a form economic radicalism. The American people backed Taft and voted him into the White House. Taft won 321 electoral votes, compared to Bryan’s 162. He also pulled close to 52% of the popular votes as against Bryan’s 43.04%.

On March 4, 1909, Taft was sworn into the White House as the our nation’s 27 th President.

Taft restructured the State Department

Taft appointed Philander Knox to the Secretary of State Department. Knox was a veteran Attorney General. Taft combined brilliantly with Knox to restructure the State Department. He once stated that the State Department should move from meeting the needs of 1800 to meeting the needs of the 1900s. To accomplish this Taft and Knox rolled out several training programs in the department. The department was also restructured into geographical divisions – Latin American, Western Europe, and the Far East.

He promoted American businesses abroad

Taft also tried to reduce America’s interference in Europe’s affairs. Instead he turned his attention to Latin American and East Asian countries, where he provided financial aid in exchange for diplomatic influence (i.e. the Dollar Diplomacy). All of his efforts were aimed at fulfilling the Monroe Doctrine on the American continent.

Taft also made sure that the diplomats and State Department’s officials had adequate training in order to advance America’s interest through diplomacy and the various consuls in Latin America.

An antitrust crusader against unethical businesses and monopolies

The Taft administration, which was one term by the way, filed over 70 antitrust lawsuits against big businesses in the manufacturing, oil and railway industry. To put into perspective just how staggering that number was Theodore Roosevelt’s close-to-eight year’s administration filed just under 40 cases.

Taft was truly a big opponent trust and big business combinations, using anti-trust legislation to halt businesses from engaging in price fixing and unethical practices that decimated competition in the market. Some of the companies that President Taft and his administration battled in the courts were: John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil Company the American Tobacco Company and United States Steel.

Taft did win many of those antitrust lawsuits. For example, he was successful in getting Standard Oil divided into seven smaller chunks.

President William Taft made six appointments to the Supreme Court

William Howard Taft’s presidency was not as flamboyant and charismatic as his predecessor’s (President Theodore Roosevelt). Taft was simply good at maintaining and enforcing reforms – things that are not considered fancy to the American public. As a result of this, some of his significant accomplishments have gone under the radar in America’s history.

Did you know that William Taft made six appointments to the U.S. Supreme Court? The only people that have surpassed that number were George Washington and Franklin D. Roosevelt. Again, it must be emphasized that President stayed only four years in the White House.

President Taft appointed Horace H. Lurton of Georgia in 1909 New York Governor Charles Evans Hughes in 1910 promoted Justice Edward Douglass White to the Chief Justice seat in 1910 Willis Van Devanter of Wyoming in 1910 Democrat Joseph R. Lamar of Louisiana and Mahlon Pitney.

Taft also made 13 appointments to the federal courts of appeal 38 to the US district courts and a number of appointments to the United States Commerce Court and the United States Court of Customs Appeals.

10th Chief Justice of the United States

It is unclear when Taft first harbored intentions to become Chief Justice of the nation’s highest court, but it was probably during his time as a student in Cincinnati Law School. Interestingly, Taft turned down nominations on two occasions (in 1902 and 1905) to serve on the bench of the U.S. Supreme Court.

After leaving the White House in 1913, Taft went straight back into law, teaching for more than a decade at Yale. So when the nomination for the chief justice of the Supreme Court came knocking at his door in 1921, Taft was more than eager to accept it.

The former president of the United States wanted nothing more than to serve on the bench. After he was nominated by President G. Harding, Taft was confirmed by the Senate, 61 to 4. He was sworn into office on July 11, 1921. He went on to leave a long-lasting mark on the court by streamlining the court’s procedures. He was also involved in modernizing the court’s infrastructure.


#8 The famous bathtub incident regarding Taft is most probably untrue

William Howard Taft weighed more than 300 pounds (136 kg) in most of his adult life with his weight being around 340 pounds (154 kg) toward the end of his presidency. He was nicknamed “Big Bill”. A popular story regarding Taft is that he became stuck in the White House bathtub and a new one had to be installed. This story is not backed by evidence and is most probably untrue. When Taft was President, a specially crafted tub, which was more than 7 feet long, 41 inches wide and weighed a ton, was installed in the White House in which he couldn’t possibly get stuck. There is a well known photo of that tub with the four bathtub installers sitting in it. However, there was at least one incident involving a bathtub which was true. In 1915, Taft entered a hotel tub but failed to take the fluid displacement into account. The dirty water flooded the floor and trickled onto the heads of guests in the downstairs dining room.



Comments:

  1. Halburt

    I am sorry, that has interfered... I understand this question. Let's discuss. Write here or in PM.

  2. Meinyard

    This is accurate information

  3. Arnt

    I am assured, what is it - a false way.



Write a message