Interesting

Coin of Demetrius I of Macedon

Coin of Demetrius I of Macedon


Early career Edit

Demetrius served with his father, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, during the Second War of the Diadochi. He participated in the Battle of Paraitakene where he commanded the cavalry on the right flank. Despite the Antigonid left flank, commanded by Peithon, being routed, and the center, commanded by Antigonus, being dealt heavy losses at the hands of the famous Silver Shields, Demetrius was victorious on the right, and his success there ultimately prevented the battle from being a complete loss.

Demetrius was again present at the conclusive Battle of Gabiene. Directly after the battle, while Antigonus held the betrayed Eumenes, Demetrius was one of the few who implored his father to spare the Greek successor’s life.

At the age of twenty-two he was left by his father to defend Syria against Ptolemy the son of Lagus. He was defeated at the Battle of Gaza, but soon partially repaired his loss by a victory in the neighbourhood of Myus. [1] In the spring of 310, he was soundly defeated when he tried to expel Seleucus I Nicator from Babylon his father was defeated in the autumn. As a result of this Babylonian War, Antigonus lost almost two thirds of his empire: all eastern satrapies fell to Seleucus.

After several campaigns against Ptolemy on the coasts of Cilicia and Cyprus, Demetrius sailed with a fleet of 250 ships to Athens. He freed the city from the power of Cassander and Ptolemy, expelled the garrison which had been stationed there under Demetrius of Phalerum, and besieged and took Munychia (307 BC). After these victories he was worshipped by the Athenians as a tutelary deity under the title of Soter (Σωτήρ) ("Saviour"). [1] At this time Demetrius married Eurydike, an Athenian noblewoman who was reputed to be descendant from Miltiades she was the widow of Ophellas, Ptolemy's governor of Cyrene. [2] Antigonus sent Demetrius instructions to sail to Cyprus and attack Ptolemy's positions there.

Demetrius sailed from Athens in the spring of 306 BC and in accordance with his father's orders he first went to Caria where he summoned the Rhodians to support his naval campaign. The Rhodians refused, a decision which would have dire consequences. In the campaign of 306 BC, he defeated Ptolemy and Menelaus, Ptolemy's brother, in the naval Battle of Salamis, completely destroying the naval power of Ptolemaic Egypt. [1] Demetrius conquered Cyprus in 306 BC, capturing one of Ptolemy's sons. [3] Following the victory, Antigonus assumed the title "king" and bestowed the same upon his son Demetrius. In 305 BC, he endeavoured to punish the Rhodians for having deserted his cause his ingenuity in devising new siege engines in his (ultimately unsuccessful) attempt to reduce the capital gained him the title of Poliorcetes. [1] Among his creations were a battering ram 180 feet (55 m) long, requiring 1000 men to operate it and a wheeled siege tower named "Helepolis" (or "Taker of Cities") which stood 125 feet (38 m) tall and 60 feet (18 m) wide, weighing 360,000 pounds.

In 302 BC, he returned a second time to Greece as liberator, and reinstated the Corinthian League, but his licentiousness and extravagance made the Athenians long for the government of Cassander. [1] Among his outrages was his courtship of a young boy named Democles the Handsome. The youth kept on refusing his attention but one day found himself cornered at the baths. Having no way out and being unable to physically resist his suitor, he took the lid off the hot water cauldron and jumped in. His death was seen as a mark of honor for himself and his country. In another instance, Demetrius waived a fine of 50 talents imposed on a citizen in exchange for the favors of Cleaenetus, that man's son. [4] He also sought the attention of Lamia, a Greek courtesan. He demanded 250 talents from the Athenians, which he then gave to Lamia and other courtesans to buy soap and cosmetics. [4]

He also roused the jealousy of Alexander's Diadochi Seleucus, Cassander and Lysimachus united to destroy him and his father. The hostile armies met at the Battle of Ipsus in Phrygia (301 BC). Antigonus was killed, and Demetrius, after sustaining severe losses, retired to Ephesus. This reversal of fortune stirred up many enemies against him—the Athenians refused even to admit him into their city. But he soon afterwards ravaged the territory of Lysimachus and effected a reconciliation with Seleucus, to whom he gave his daughter Stratonice in marriage. Athens was at this time oppressed by the tyranny of Lachares—a popular leader who made himself supreme in Athens in 296 BC—but Demetrius, after a protracted blockade, gained possession of the city (294 BC) and pardoned the inhabitants for their misconduct in 301 BC in a great display of mercy, a trait Demetrius highly valued in a ruler. [1]

After Athens' capitulation, Demetrius formed a new government which espoused a major dislocation of traditional democratic forms, which anti Macedonian democrats would have called oligarchy. The cyclical rotation of the secretaries of the Council and the election of archons by allotment, were both abolished. In 293/3 - 293/2 B.C., two of the most prominent men in Athens were designated by the Macedonian king, Olympiordoros and Phillipides of Paiania. The royal appointing is implied by Plutarch who says that "he established the archons which were most acceptable to the Demos." [5]

King of Macedonia Edit

In 294 BC, he established himself on the throne of Macedonia by murdering Alexander V, the son of Cassander. [1] He faced rebellion from the Boeotians but secured the region after capturing Thebes in 291 BC. That year he married Lanassa, the former wife of Pyrrhus, but his new position as ruler of Macedonia was continually threatened by Pyrrhus, who took advantage of his occasional absence to ravage the defenceless part of his kingdom (Plutarch, Pyrrhus, 7 ff.) at length, the combined forces of Pyrrhus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, assisted by the disaffected among his own subjects, obliged him to leave Macedonia in 288 BC. [1]


Demetrius I of Macedon

&ldquoDemetrius I himself on the throne of Macedonia by murdering Alexander V, the son of Cassander. He faced rebellion from the Boeotians but secured the region aftercapturing Thebes in 291 BC. That year he married Lanassa, the former wife of Pyrrhus. But his new position as ruler of Macedonia was continually threatened by Pyrrhus, who took advantage of his occasional absence to ravage the defenceless part of his kingdom (Plutarch, Pyrrhus, 7 if.) at length, the combined forces of Pyrrhus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, assisted by the disaffected among his own subjects, obliged him to leave Macedonia in 288 BC.

After besieging Athens without success he passed into Asia and attacked some of the provinces of Lysimachus with varying success. Famine and pestilence destroyed the greater part of his army, and he solicited Seleucus&rsquo support and assistance. But before he reached Syria hostilities broke out, and after he had gained some advantages over his son-in-law, Demetrius was totally forsaken by his troops on the field of battle and surrendered to Seleucus.

His son Antigonus offered all his possessions, and even his own person, in order to procure his father&rsquos liberty. But all proved unavailing, and Demetrius died after a confinement of three years (283 BC). His remains were given to Antigonus and honoured with a splendid funeral at Corinth.&rdquo - Wikipedia


Ancient Greek coins

Aigina, silver drachm. Land tortoise / Incuse, Α Ι Γ and dolphin in angles.

Corinthia Edit

Corinth: stater. Pegasos flying l./ Head of Athena l.

Peloponnesus Edit

Colonies in Asia Minor(Ionia) Edit

Greek coin from Ionia, Klazomenai 499 BC

Colonies in the Black sea Edit

Olbia. late 5th Century BC

Colonies in Thrace Edit

Colonies in Illyria Edit

Dyrrachium - Drachma: Magistrates: ΚΤΗΤΟΣ & ΦΑ ΝΙΣ ΚΟΥ

Apollonia - Drachma - Magistrates: Aibatios / Carhnos

Ebusus (Ibiza). Circa 210-early 2nd Century BC. Æ

Tetradrachme Mazedonien Alexander d. Gr. (336-325 v. Chr.) mit dem Löwenfell

Baktria Edit

O// helmeted Eukratides r. R// ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΜΕΓΑΛΟΥ The Dioscuri on horseback, ΕΥΚΡΑΤΙΔΟΥ in ex

O// Diademed bust of Plato r. R//: Helios, riding a quadriga. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΠΛΑΤΩΝΟΣ

Seleucia Edit

Seleucus I (Nicator), B.C. 312-280, the founder of the dynasty.

Antiochus I Soter. (co-ruler from 291, ruled 281–261 BC)
Silver. O// Head of Antiochus I. R//ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ Apollo, naked, seated on omphalos, holding arrows ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ (see: en:Antiochus I Soter)

O// Head of Antiochus IV Epiphanes. (175–164 BC)
R// ΘΕΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ Zeus Nikephoros enthroned, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ (see: en:Antiochus IV Epiphanes)

Alexander I Balas (154–145 BC)
/ on reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ. 150 – 149 BC. (see: en:Alexander I Balas)


The ruling members of the Antigonid dynasty were:




Antigonid Rulers

























































King Reign (BC) Consort(s) Comments

Antigonus I Monophthalmus (Western Asian Antigonid kingdom)
306� BC Stratonice One of Alexander the Great's top generals a major participant in the so-called "funeral games" following that king's death.

Demetrius I Poliorcetes (Macedon, Cicilia)
294� BC Phila
Ptolemais
Deïdameia
Lanassa
?Eurydice
?Unnamed Illyrian woman
Son of Antigonus I Monophthalmus. Demetrius' wife Phila was a daughter of Antipater, and ancestor of all subsequent Antigonid kings of Macedon, except Antigonus III Doson, through her son Antigonus II Gonatas. Antigonus III Doson was descended from the marriage of Demetrius and Ptolemais, who was a daughter of Ptolemy I Soter and mother of Doson's father, Demetrius the Fair, the ephemeral King of Cyrene. Deïdameia was a daughter of Aeacides of Epirus and sister of Pyrrhus, she had one son, Alexander, by Demetrius. Demetrius had a further two sons, Demetrius the Thin and Corrhagus, the former by an unnamed Illyrian woman, the latter by a woman named Eurydice. Demetrius I Poliorcetes was the first Antigonid king of Macedon.

Antigonus II Gonatas (Macedon)
276� BC Phila Son of Demetrius Poliorcetes and Phila, grandson of Antigonus I Monophthalmus. His wife, Phila, was the daughter of his sister, Stratonice. Only one known legitimate child, Demetrius II Aetolicus.

Demetrius the Fair (Cyrene)
c. 250 BC Olympias of Larissa
Berenice II
Son of Demetrius I Poliorcetes and Ptolemaïs. Father of Antigonus III Doson and, apparently, Echecrates by Olympias.

Demetrius II Aetolicus (Macedon)
239� BC
Stratonice of Macedon
Phthia of Epirus
Nicaea of Corinth
Chryseis
Son of Antigonus II and Phila. Stratonice of Macedon was a daughter of Antiochus I Soter and Stratonice. Phthia of Epirus was a daughter of Alexander II of Epirus and Olympias II of Epirus. Nicaea of Corinth was the widow of Demetrius' cousin, Alexander of Corinth. Chryseis was a former captive of Demetrius. [4] Only known son, Philip by Chryseis, also had a daughter by Stratonice of Macedon, Apama III.

Antigonus III Doson (Macedon)
229� BC Chryseis Son of Demetrius the Fair and Olympias of Larissa. Children unknown.


Philip V (Macedon)
221� BC Polycratia of Argos Son of Demetrius II and Chryseis. [4] At least four children: Perseus of Macedon, Apame, Demetrius and Philippus.


Perseus (Macedon)
179� BC
(died 166 BC)
Laodice V The last ruler of Macedon. Laodice V was a daughter of the Seleucid king, Seleucus IV Philopator. At least two sons, Philip and Alexander.

The Greek rebel against Rome and last King of Macedonia, Andriscus, claimed to be the son of Perseus.


Coin of Demetrius I of Macedon - History

Near the end of the 3rd century BC, Rome was embroiled in war with Carthage when they intercepted a ship carrying Macedonian delegates and a Carthaginian ambassador. Even more important than who was on this ship was what they were carrying: a proposed treaty between Hannibal, Commander-in-Chief of Carthage, and Philip V, King of Macedon. The terms stated that in the event of a Roman defeat at the hands of Hannibal, Carthage would have sole right to negotiate the Roman surrender but would protect Macedon against any reprisals. As we now know, Rome did not fall to Hannibal and Macedon quickly found itself alone in a fight for its independence and dwindling power.

Macedon had more than just Rome to contend with at this time. In the 4th century neighbouring cities in central Greece had formed a confederation to oppose Alexander the Great and after the death of Alexander, continued to oppose Macedonia under the rule of Alexander’s Diadochi. This confederation was called the Aetolian League and would have mixed success fighting the Macedonians throughout the next century. In the Social War of 220-217 BC, the Aetolians would lose to Philip V, newly crowned King of Macedon. A tit-for-tat would see the Aetolian city of Thermos sacked by Philip as an act of retaliation. The Aetolians grew desperate and entered into a pact with an emerging power of the Mediterranean, one that wished to see the subjugation of Greece as a whole, Rome.

Rome had found itself its first Greek ally and an important stepping stone in its pursuit of control over Greece. With the Second Punic War in full-swing, the Romans were stretched thin and had trouble halting Macedon’s advance on Roman territory in the Balkans. Philip had seized on the opportunity of Rome’s preoccupation with Carthage to attempt an invasion of Italy. He attempted to convince the Aetolians to join his campaign for universal dominion and sued for peace, which the Aetolians accepted. The reasons for doing so were made clear in a speech by Agelaus of Naupactus:

For even now it is evident to any one who pays even a moderate attention to public affairs, that whether the Carthaginians conquer the Romans, or the Romans the Carthaginians, it is in every way improbable that the victors will remain contented with the empire of Sicily and Italy.

Five years had passed since this peace when Philip was intending to come to the aid of Hannibal and the Aetolians was noticing Rome’s fortunes improving. Taking advantage of Rome’s offer of further support in a war against Macedon, the Aetolian League partnered with the Kingdoms of Sparta and Pergamon and set their sights once more on Philip. The Romans had managed to capitalise on the animosity between the Aetolians and Macedonians to force the Greek states to fight each other once more while it was handling Hannibal and the Carthaginians.

Philip had early success against the Aetolians and Rome sent reinforcements to ensure Philip remained preoccupied and far away from Hannibal. The Aetolians eventually found themselves alone after King Attalus I fled back to his home of Pergamon after hearing of moves being made against his empire. With Rome still tied up, the Aetolian League was forced to sue for peace with Philip. The Romans, now confident they had achieved their goal of delaying Philip’s conquest of Italy, followed suit.


The members of the Antigonid dynasty were:

Antigonid Rulers
King Reign (BCE) Consort(s) Comments
Antigonus I Monophthalmus 306 BC – 301 BC Stratonice
Demetrius I Poliorcetes 294 BC-287 BC Phila
Ptolemais
Ptolemais was a daughter of Ptolemy I Soter and mother of Demetrius the Fair, King of Cyrene.
Antigonus II Gonatas 276 BC-239 BC Phila Son of Demetrius Poliorcetes, grandson of Antigonus
Demetrius II Aetolicus 239 BC-229 BC Stratonice of Macedon
Phthia of Epirus
Nicaea of Corinth
Son of Antigonus II and Phila
Antigonus III Doson 229 BC - 221 BC Phthia of Epirus Son of Demetrius the Fair, King of Cyrene.
Philip V 221 BC-179 BC Polycratia of Argos Son of Demetrius II and Phthia of Epirus
Perseus 179 BC-168 BC Laodice V, Seleucid Princess

The Greek rebel against Rome and last King of Macedonia, Andriscus, claimed to be the son of Perseus.


Perseus of Macedon

Antigonid dynasty . last scion of the dynasty, Perseus of Macedon, who reigned between 179 and 168 BC, proved unable to stop the advancing Roman legions and Macedon's defeat.

Third Macedonian War

Third Macedonian War . Philip V of Macedon died and his ambitious son, Perseus, succeeded to the throne. In pursuit of an alliance, Perseus married Laodice, the daughter of Seleucus.

Macedonia (ancient kingdom)

Macedonia (ancient kingdom) . also called Macedon (/ˈmæsɪdɒn/), was an ancient kingdom on the periphery of Archaic and Classical Greece, and later the dominant state of Hellenistic.

Philip V of Macedon

Philip V of Macedon . lead Macedon against Rome in the First and Second Macedonian Wars, losing the latter but allying with Rome in the Roman-Seleucid War towards the end of his.

Alexander (son of Perseus)

Alexander (son of Perseus) . Alexander, son of Perseus of Macedon, was a child at the conquest of his father by the Romans, and after the triumph of Aemilus Paullus in 167 BC, was.

Andriscus

Andriscus . of Rome's former enemy, Perseus of Macedon she had married Demetrius after Perseus' defeat and death. It has been suggested that being the wife of the.

Perseus (disambiguation)

Perseus (disambiguation) . Perseus is a figure in Greek mythology. Perseus may also refer to: Perseus (geometer), ancient Greek mathematician Perseus of Macedon, last king of Macedon.

Fourth Macedonian War

Fourth Macedonian War . state of affairs continued until 151 BC, when Andriscus, a fuller from Aeolis, claimed to be a son of the last Antigonid king, Perseus of Macedon, whom.

Antigonid Macedonian army

Antigonid Macedonian army . by Philip's death and the accession of his son Perseus of Macedon. By the eve of the Third Macedonian War, Perseus, thanks to his father, had enough grain.

List of kings of Macedonia

List of kings of Macedonia . Philip V Φίλιππος Ε' 221–179 BC Perseus Περσέας 179–167 BC After Perseus's defeat at the Battle of Pydna in 167 BC, Macedon was divided into four republics.


Rare gold coin of Athens

This extremely rare gold stater of Athens, depicting Athena, was issued by the tyrant Lachares in 296 BC to pay his troops during the siege of Athens by Demetrius "the besieger", king of Macedon. The colossal gold and ivory statue of the goddess Athena, in the Parthenon on the Acropolis, was stripped of its gold which was then struck into coins. This was the only known example when King George III gave it to William Hunter. A few more have turned up but it is still excessively rare.

The cities of ancient Greece generally used silver for their coins. Gold, with its high value, was unsuitable for small transactions and gold coins were usually only issued in an emergency.

Athens, in Attica (a province of central Greece) is the most famous of all ancient Greek cities, both politically and culturally. The pinnacle of its glory was in the mid-fifth century BC, between the Persian wars and the Peloponnesian war, when it was ruled by Pericles.

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Antiochus I, ruler of the Seleucid Empire

This article is about the Seleucid King of the third century BC. For the king of Commagene of the first century BC, see Antiochus I Theos of Commagene.

Gold stater of Antiochus I minted at Ai-Khanoum, c. 275 BC. Obverse: Diademed head of Antiochus right. Reverse: Nude Apollo seated on omphalos left, leaning on bow and holding two arrows. Greek legend: BAΣI㦾ΩΣ ANTIOXOY (of King Antiochos). Δ monogram of Ai-Khanoum in left field.

Silver coin of Antiochus I. The reverse shows Apollo seated on an omphalos. The Greek inscription reads ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ (of king Antiochus). Antiochus I Soter (Greek: Αντίοχος Α' Σωτήρ, i.e. Antiochus the Savior, unknown – 261 BC), was a king of the Hellenistic Seleucid Empire. He reigned in 281� BC. Antiochus I was half Persian, his mother Apama being one of the eastern princesses whom Alexander the Great had given as wives to his generals in 324 BC. In 294 BC, prior to the death of his father Seleucus I, Antiochus married his stepmother, Stratonice, daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes. His elderly father reportedly instigated the marriage after discovering that his son was in danger of dying of lovesickness. Stratonice bore five children to Antiochus: Seleucus (he was executed for rebellion), Laodice, Apama II, Stratonice of Macedon and Antiochus II Theos, who succeeded his father as king.

On the assassination of his father in 281 BC, the task of holding together the empire was a formidable one. A revolt in Syria broke out almost immediately. Antiochus was soon compelled to make peace with his father's murderer, Ptolemy Keraunos, apparently abandoning Macedonia and Thrace. In Anatolia he was unable to reduce Bithynia or the Persian dynasties that ruled in Cappadocia.

In 278 BC the Gauls broke into Anatolia, and a victory that Antiochus won over these Gauls by using Indian war elephants (275 BC) is said to have been the origin of his title of Soter (Gr. for "saviour").

At the end of 275 BC the question of Coele-Syria, which had been open between the houses of Seleucus and Ptolemy since the partition of 301 BC, led to hostilities (the First Syrian War). It had been continuously in Ptolemaic occupation, but the house of Seleucus maintained its claim. War did not materially change the outlines of the two kingdoms, though frontier cities like Damascus and the coast districts of Asia Minor might change hands.

On March 27 268 BC Antiochus I laid the foundation for the Ezida Temple in Borsippa.[1] His eldest son Seleucus had ruled in the east as viceroy from 275 BC(?) till 268/267 BC Antiochus put his son to death in the latter year on the charge of rebellion. Circa 262 BC Antiochus tried to break the growing power of Pergamum by force of arms, but suffered defeat near Sardis and died soon afterwards. He was succeeded in 261 BC by his second son Antiochus II Theos.[2]

Antiochus I, called Soter (“the preserver”) (324-262 or 261 bc), king of Syria (280-262 or 261 bc). The second of the Seleucids, he was the son of Seleucus I, one of the generals and successors of Alexander the Great. In 275 bc Antiochus won a victory over the Galatians in Asia Minor but lost considerable territory to Ptolemy II. He was killed in battle during a war (263-261 bc) against Eumenes I (reigned 263-241 bc), ruler of Pergamum in Asia Minor.

© 1993-2003 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Father: Seleucus I of Syria b: ABT 358 BC

Antiochus I Soter, King of the Seleucids, was born prior to 281 BC (the beginning of his reign as King of the Seleucids) died circa 261 BC.

Antiochus I Soter (Greek: Αντίοχος Α' Σωτήρ, i.e. Antiochus the Savior, unknown - 261 BC), was a king of the Hellenistic Seleucid Empire. He reigned from 281 BC - 261 BC.

Antiochus I was half Persian, his mother Apama being one of the eastern princesses whom Alexander the Great had given as wives to his generals in 324 BC. In 294 BC, prior to the death of his father Seleucus I, Antiochus married his stepmother, Stratonice, daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes. His elderly father reportedly instigated the marriage after discovering that his son was in danger of dying of lovesickness.

On the assassination of his father in 281 BC, the task of holding together the empire was a formidable one. A revolt in Syria broke out almost immediately. Antiochus was soon compelled to make peace with his father's murderer, Ptolemy Keraunos, apparently abandoning Macedonia and Thrace. In Asia Minor he was unable to reduce Bithynia or the Persian dynasties that ruled in Cappadocia.

In 278 BC the Gauls broke into Asia Minor, and a victory that Antiochus won over these hordes is said to have been the origin of his title of Soter (Gr. for "saviour").

At the end of 275 BC the question of Coele-Syria, which had been open between the houses of Seleucus and Ptolemy since the partition of 301 BC, led to hostilities (the First Syrian War). It had been continuously in Ptolemaic occupation, but the house of Seleucus maintained its claim.

War did not materially change the outlines of the two kingdoms, though frontier cities like Damascus and the coast districts of Asia Minor might change hands.

His eldest son Seleucus had ruled in the east as viceroy from 275 BC(?) till 268/267 BC Antiochus put his son to death in the latter year on the charge of rebellion. Circa 262 BC Antiochus tried to break the growing power of Pergamum by force of arms, but suffered defeat near Sardis and died soon afterwards. He was succeeded in 261 BC by his second son Antiochus II Theos.[1]

Antiochus I was half Persian, his mother Apama being one of the eastern princesses whom Alexander the Great had given as wives to his generals in 324 BC. In 294 BC, prior to the death of his father Seleucus I, Antiochus married his stepmother, Stratonice, daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes. His elderly father reportedly instigated the marriage after discovering that his son was in danger of dying of lovesickness.

On the assassination of his father in 281 BC, the task of holding together the empire was a formidable one. A revolt in Syria broke out almost immediately. Antiochus was soon compelled to make peace with his father's murderer, Ptolemy Keraunos, apparently abandoning Macedonia and Thrace. In Asia Minor he was unable to reduce Bithynia or the Persian dynasties that ruled in Cappadocia.

In 278 BC the Gauls broke into Asia Minor, and a victory that Antiochus won over these hordes is said to have been the origin of his title of Soter (Gr. for "saviour").

At the end of 275 BC the question of Coele-Syria, which had been open between the houses of Seleucus and Ptolemy since the partition of 301 BC, led to hostilities (the First Syrian War). It had been continuously in Ptolemaic occupation, but the house of Seleucus maintained its claim.

War did not materially change the outlines of the two kingdoms, though frontier cities like Damascus and the coast districts of Asia Minor might change hands.

His eldest son Seleucus had ruled in the east as viceroy from 275 BC(?) till 268/267 BC Antiochus put his son to death in the latter year on the charge of rebellion. Circa 262 BC Antiochus tried to break the growing power of Pergamum by force of arms, but suffered defeat near Sardis and died soon afterwards. He was succeeded in 261 BC by his second son Antiochus II Theos

Antiochus I was half Persian, his mother Apama being one of the eastern princesses whom Alexander the Great had given as wives to his generals in 324 BC. In 294 BC, prior to the death of his father Seleucus I, Antiochus married his stepmother, Stratonice, daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes. His elderly father reportedly instigated the marriage after discovering that his son was in danger of dying of lovesickness. Stratonice bore five children to Antiochus: Seleucus (he was executed for rebellion), Laodice, Apama II, Stratonice of Macedon and Antiochus II Theos, who succeeded his father as king.

On the assassination of his father in 281 BC, the task of holding together the empire was a formidable one. A revolt in Syria broke out almost immediately. Antiochus was soon compelled to make peace with his father's murderer, Ptolemy Keraunos, apparently abandoning Macedonia and Thrace. In Anatolia he was unable to reduce Bithynia or the Persian dynasties that ruled in Cappadocia.

In 278 BC the Gauls broke into Anatolia, and a victory that Antiochus won over these hordes is said to have been the origin of his title of Soter (Gr. for "saviour").

At the end of 275 BC the question of Coele-Syria, which had been open between the houses of Seleucus and Ptolemy since the partition of 301 BC, led to hostilities (the First Syrian War). It had been continuously in Ptolemaic occupation, but the house of Seleucus maintained its claim. War did not materially change the outlines of the two kingdoms, though frontier cities like Damascus and the coast districts of Asia Minor might change hands.

On March 27th 268 BC Antiochus I laid the foundation for the Ezida Temple in Borsippa.[1] His eldest son Seleucus had ruled in the east as viceroy from 275 BC(?) till 268/267 BC Antiochus put his son to death in the latter year on the charge of rebellion. Circa 262 BC Antiochus tried to break the growing power of Pergamum by force of arms, but suffered defeat near Sardis and died soon afterwards. He was succeeded in 261 BC by his second son Antiochus II Theos.[2]

Nicknames: "Soter", "??t. ?' S?t?? Se?e. d?? t?? S. a?", "Antiochus I 'Soter-the Preserver' of Syria Soter-the Preserver", "? King"